Other Long-Term Liabilities

A balance sheet item that includes obligations which are not going to be paid off within the year or operating cycle, but are not included in the "long term liabilities" category. Other long-term liabilities are commonly found directly beneath the long-term liabilities on the balance sheet. They are part of total liabilities, and the entries are deemed to be not important enough to warrant identifying each amount individually.

Finding what makes up this entry can be difficult, but sometimes it is included in the footnotes as a table - other times, several notes will be given. Other long-term liabilities might include items such as deferred credits, customers deposits or some estimated tax liabilities. Failing to account for other long-term liabilities may make a company look like it has a stronger financial position than it actually does. That is, while its profits may be strong for a given year, it may have to meet its other long-term liabilities in future years, when profits may not be as strong.


Investment dictionary. . 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Deferred Long-Term Liability Charges — A collection of future company liabilities that will typically be summed up and shown as one line item on the balance sheet. The charges are most often made up of deferred tax liabilities that are to be paid more than one year in the future;… …   Investment dictionary

  • current liabilities — Amounts owed by a business to other organizations and individuals that should be paid within one year from the balance sheet date. These generally consist of trade creditors, bills of exchange payable, amounts owed to group and related companies …   Accounting dictionary

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  • current liabilities — short term debts such as bank overdraft, creditors and provisions set aside to pay taxation and other commitments (for example, holiday or long service leave) and expected to come due within one year of the Balance Sheet. Glossary of Business… …   Financial and business terms

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